writing

New fiction in The Conium Review

In December, I had my fiction printed in The Conium Review (volume 6) right around the time I had my nonfiction printed in the Hawai’i Review. Like I’ve said before, even though I prefer having my short pieces published online because then they’re (usually) free to read and easier to share, it still feels really cool to be in print! There’s just an added level of legitimacy to it. It also feels one step closer to putting out a book.

My story in this issue of Conium is called “Holy Water,” and it’s completely surreal. I had a lot of fun writing it. The character has my birth name, and the story begins in my high school as it’s filling up with water. She’s on a journey of sorts, and meets many interesting men along the way. If you want to get a copy of the issue, head over to The Conium Review‘s website and buy it for $12.

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writing

First published poem

jay vera summer alien mouthAlien Mouth published my poem “Schiller Woods Head” last October. PLEASE READ THE POEM BEFORE READING THIS POST.

All of my publications are exciting, but this is especially exciting because poetry isn’t my primary genre, and I feel less confident in my poetry than my prose. But, the acceptance wasn’t an accident, and I’ve had a second poetry acceptance since then. Yay!

I wrote this poem while taking the one poetry class I took as a (fiction) MFA student. As part of a class exercise in which we had to pick a place on the map and write about it, I imagined myself walking in the Schiller Woods forest preserve in Illinois and wrote based on that. I zoomed in via Google maps, then closed my eyes. I’ve never actually been to the Schiller Woods forest preserve, but I hope to one day. The map labeled an entrance “Schiller Woods Head,” and I liked the idea that only some readers would figure that out. I think most would take “head” literally, as a human head, so the title has a double meaning.

My purpose was to focus on colors and images and to play with that it’s-okay-if-people-don’t-know-exactly-what-you’re-talking-about-as-long-as-you-convey-a-feeling aspect of poetry that isn’t really there in (non-experimental) fiction and creative nonfiction. There is a literal translation to the poem, however. As someone who has migraine and fibromyalgia, I have very sensitive eyes and can be extremely photosensitive to the point where on a sunny day without sunglasses I can hardly make things out and there are just blobs of color everywhere. I imagined myself entering Schiller Woods on one of those extremely sunny days, being unable to make out everything around me but still enjoying the beauty of it, and I thought that made a nice metaphor for how I’m going through life, sort of stunned and overwhelmed but also in awe of the vastness and never-ending feeling of it.

PS, I think “real” poets don’t explain their poems, or something? But whatever, I do, and I’m a real poet now, so deal with it. :)

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creative nonfiction, writing

New essay in the Hawai’i Review

hawaii review jay vera summerMy essay, “Fibromyalgia, Me, and Doris Lee” is in the Hawai’i Review ’87. I’m excited to be getting some print publications, since most of my publications thus far have been online. I kind of like online pubs better because then I can share the link with my friends, but print publications seem to still be viewed as more prestigious, and it’s fun to hold something that feels like a book and see my work in it. Seeing my work in print gives me confidence that some day I’ll have an entire book of my own. :)

hawaii review jay vera summerYou can order a copy of the Hawai’i Review ’87 by sending a check for $10 along with an address to:

Hawai’i Review 
Hemenway 107
2445 Campus Road
Honolulu, HI 96822

For more info on the Hawai’i Review, click here.

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mfa, writing

New fiction in animal: a beast of a literary magazine

Okay, so this publication isn’t that new, but check out “The Grooming Salon,” a story I had published in animal: a beast of a literary magazine last November.

The story is fiction, but the setting details draw a lot from my past work experience as a dog groomer. An earlier (but longer and not as good) version of this story is what I used when applying to MFA programs.

I really enjoy this story and am so pleased that it found a home.

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writing

New fiction in Typehouse Literary Magazine

Check out my short story, “The Blue Line,” in the latest issue (vol. 4 no. 3 issue 12) of Typehouse Magazine. (Download the pdf, then scroll to page 151.) I had a lot of fun writing this one, and I’m excited it’s out in the world. It takes place in Chicago, which hasn’t been my home for a few years, but deep down inside, still feels like home.

I love writing unique and sometimes strange characters, and this one was no exception. At first her name was Wendy (a play on Windy, from the song by The Association), but then I changed it to Jessica, my birth name. She isn’t me, and the story isn’t true, but there’s part of me in her and I love her so much. She’s grappling with issues I grapple with–finding her life and career purpose, figuring out what role romantic love should play in her life, and navigating obstacles caused by health problems.

The description of migraine aura in this story is the one part that is completely true to my experience. I’ve gone totally blind while walking on the streets of Chicago and it was terrifying.

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writing

New flash fiction out in The Nottingham Review!

Check out my story: The Monster in my House. It’s in The Nottingham Review out of England, which means I can officially say I’ve been published internationally. Is that slightly misleading? Who cares, I’m still saying it!

This is a super short piece and I like it quite a bit. I read it at an event last year and received good feedback and a surprising amount of laughs. I must make it sound funny when I read out loud, because I don’t think the story itself is very humorous.

Remembering the reading I did last year has me thinking… I want to move. I want to move somewhere with a larger lit community. Somewhere I can do more readings. Does blogging that sentiment outright count as sending my intention to the universe or whatever? Get me out of Tampa, world!

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fibromyalgia, health, writing

New publication in Luna Luna Magazine!

Hello lovely & faithful blog readers,

I am happy to share that I have a new publication out in Luna Luna Magazine!

It is super short. I’d be honored if you read it, and even more honored if you shared it. I wrote this three-part flash essay a couple (or more?) years ago, but recently revised it and began sending it out as part of a major submission push in May. I’m happy to say that push is paying off, and in addition to this pub, I have two more waiting in the pipeline. (I also have 15 more unpublished pieces that I’m still pushing out.)

This latest publication is meant to give insight into what it’s like to have fibromyalgia. The timing is perfect, because I’m in the middle of a flare-up. I’m going to write about that elsewhere, however.

Hope all of you are well!

Jay

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weirderary, writing

New issue of weirderary!

weirderary Issue 5 dropped recently! I can’t believe that the lit mag we started has been around for two years and five issues so far. We will be making some changes to weirderary soon, as you can read about in my letter from the editor in this issue.

I’m now the editor in chief of weirderary, which is good because trying to distribute work evenly and make decisions as a team wasn’t always working. Plus, with all of us graduating and (possibly) moving away from Tampa, working collaboratively in equal capacities would become even more difficult.  The other founding editors still want to be involved, and moving forward I plan on devising a new structure for the lit mag, figuring out each person’s title and responsibilities.

I’d be grateful if you’d check out weirderary‘s latest issue, follow weirderary on twitter, and share your favorite pieces that we’ve published either on social media or privately with anyone you think might like them.

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